Kant Get Enough of the Apocalypse? Apply Kant’s Categorical Imperative to the Walking Dead

Beth 1In my sophomore year of college, I took an ethical theory class.  We ambled through philosophies that sought to answer the question: what makes right actions right?  We decided, by the end of the course, that the best ethical theory was the Immanuel Kant’s categorical imperative.  In terms of reasonably determining the best course of action an individual should take in an ethical dilemma, it had the least shortcomings.  Now, I haven’t been a sophomore in college for over 13 years, but I remember this much about Kant’s imperative: it posits that if everyone took a certain action and the results were okay, then the action would be okay.  To examine the correctness of an action, you create a maxim.  For example, if my maxim is “It is correct to steal,” my maxim would be flawed.  If everyone in the world stole everything, then there would be no rule or law, money would have no value, and our exchange system would collapse.  Clearly, such a maxim is infeasible. Continue reading “Kant Get Enough of the Apocalypse? Apply Kant’s Categorical Imperative to the Walking Dead”

Kant Get Enough of the Apocalypse? Apply Kant’s Categorical Imperative to the Walking Dead