Dalek and Us: Grey Areas, Otherization, and Monstrosity

Not all monsters are evil, to be sure. But we often assume they are. My dissertation, and thus my primary work of scholarship right now, focuses on monstrosity, but monstrosity and evil often correlate in pop culture representations.  Shortly after I started my blog, when I was a neophyte blogger and had not yet entered a PhD program, I had a profound interest in cultural manifestations of evil: who do we call evil, who gets to make that decision, what are the consequences of the word “evil,” and how do we navigate the fine line between excusing evil and seeking to understand it? Nurse Jude, played by Jessica Lange, says with her usual self-assurance in Season Two of American Horror Story, “All monsters are human.”  At the same time, writer Stephen T. Asma, in his book On Monsters, highlights the precarious nature of assuming a correlation between monstrosity and innate evil with his concept of “accidental monstrosity,” a phrase he uses to describe those who, after a slip and a slide in the wrong direction, become monsters without meaning to.  Monstrosity and evil, in any case, have one thing in common: both are massive umbrella terms that encompass multiple gradations and examples within their denotations. 

Continue reading “Dalek and Us: Grey Areas, Otherization, and Monstrosity”
Dalek and Us: Grey Areas, Otherization, and Monstrosity

Get Uncomfortable with Get Out

 

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Photo Credit – Get Out

I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect when entering the theater to watch the newly released Get Out.  On the one hand, the previews looked creepy enough.  And then there’s the intriguing prospect of a horror movie that considers the problem of racial injustice.  I thought that the movie had incredible potential – and was excited to see it – but I thought it could bust, too.  Happily, the film was strange and jarring but also excellent.  Get Out takes typical social discomfort and morphs it into unsettling suspense.  The film facilitates a lot of pathos from the viewer toward the characters and makes a bold statement about the unsolved problem of racial inequity in America.  Since the film has been out for a couple of weeks, and since it may be easier to discuss by referring to the ending, there may be spoilers in this review.  Beware!

Continue reading “Get Uncomfortable with Get Out”

Get Uncomfortable with Get Out