Victor Frankenstein and Insufficiency of Intention

Victor Frankenstein.jpg The story goes that Mary Shelley was lounging around with a group of people – perhaps one dark and stormy night – and someone presented a challenge: who could develop the best horror story on the spot?  And so the evolution of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein began, the story of a perhaps-mad scientist who endeavors to bring a corpse to life and achieve all the fame and glory that would conceivably come with such a feat.  I don’t know if Shelley won the contest, but her story has become both a popular Romantic-Era novel and the stuff of legend and campfire tales.  Of course, in an era obsessed with vampires and zombies, it’s easy to overlook Frankenstein’s monster, or Frankenstein himself.  In the most recent reincarnation of the story, the movie Victor Frankenstein, director Paul McGuigan tells Shelley’s story from a different angle: The story focuses heavily on Victor Frankenstein, true to Shelley’s text, but it eschews a thorough examination of the monster.  The result?  We get less a horror movie, and more a character study. Continue reading “Victor Frankenstein and Insufficiency of Intention”

Victor Frankenstein and Insufficiency of Intention